News Heritage Watch - Preserving the Past, Enriching the Future. http://www.heritagewatchinternational.org/Table/Newsflash/ Sun, 28 May 2017 22:06:20 -0500 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Heritage for Kids Report http://www.heritagewatchinternational.org/heritage-for-kids-report.html Cambodian school children have been putting the basic concept of heritage into the life of their communities.

Living in a remote community, ninety Cambodian school children at Banteay Chhmar Primary School are playing an innovative role in the implementation of the “Heritage for Kids” Program.  This program provides one of several measures to protect the famous architectural, historical, and cultural site of Banteay Chhmar from destruction caused by illicit trade in cultural properties, illegal looting activities, and land-used development.

Why does Heritage Watch focus this training on school-aged children?

Children often more easily acclimate to their surroundings and the willingness to learn. It is often said that it is much easier to learn a language when one is young. The same idea is applied here toward cultural preservation.  In this regard, we are starting to educate on heritage values, protection, and preservation at an early age, in hoping this becomes a life-long aspiration to protect and preserve the heritage treasures of Banteay Chhmar.  Importantly, the children will apply their new knowledge of heritage throughout their families and communities.

90 kids with the 16 high school-aged students in front of Banteay Chhmar temple

Heritage for Kids Objectives

  1. Provide heritage education to school-aged children who were born, attend schools, and live within the cultural heritage environment of Banteay Chhmar. Through this program, they will understand their long-standing ties to the cultural heritage of the site.
  2. Design lesson plans for and implement the heritage education program at the primary and secondary school level in Cambodia, the pilot program being at Banteay Chhmar.

Methods

The Heritage for Kids Project chose ninety (90) children from two classes from the 5th Grade of Banteay Chhmar primary school.  The students are all between 10 and 15 years old. The project provided the kids with basic concepts of heritage, both tangible and intangible.  Activities included colouring and reading comic books on Cambodian heritage, site and museum visits, and other hands-on activities. 

Lesson plans and educational activities were introduced to the teachers in advance, in order to get them directly involved in helping their students perform.

The project also encouraged the children to begin thinking about the different forms of heritage, in terms of how looting affects the site, in what other ways the site is destroyed, and to assess the lack of local knowledge about the site and what can be done to address these problems.

 

The Education Program

            The group followed an agenda which allowed everyone to understand certain meanings of heritage, culture, and other important terms used in the field. The following presents some of the activities conducted during the training program.

1.     Define “heritage.”  What does it mean to you?

2.     What are the different forms of heritage

3.     Examples of natural heritage: mountain, sea, river, lake

4.     Examples of Cultural heritage:

4.1           Tangible cultural heritage

4.2           Intangible cultural heritage

5.     What is local heritage: archaeological sites, burials, ancient mounts, kiln sites, excavation sites and tools, artifacts

6.     Heritage at the museum: preservation, conservation and management

7.     Colouring heritage comic books and site visit

8.     Trip to visit Banteay Meanchey museum

9.     What can we do about preserving the heritage of this site? Why is Cambodian heritage so important to you?

Note: The heritage education classes normally occurred on Saturday afternoons with two sessions, one hour per session.

In-class activities

Involving the 16 students of Banteay Chhmar High School

Sixteen high school students (Grades 11 and 12) of Banteay Chhmar High School joined the Heritage for Kids project as mentors, to pass on their knowledge and experience of heritage and the site to the children.  The high school students had been trained in heritage and research methodology through the Khmer-Thai research team of the Cultural Relationship in Mainland SEA Project (CRMA). These older students had previously conducted training research at the Banteay Chhmar site. They led the children around the many historical sites throughout the Banteay Chhmar community.

 


The children worked together in groups at the site


Colouring

Visiting Banteay Meanchey Museum

Closing Ceremony

On 19 July 2015, the Closing Ceremony of the “Heritage for Kids” Project was organized in Banteay Chhmar Primary School with over 150 participants. These included dignitaries such as the General Director of Heritage: Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts, the Governor of Banteay Meanchey province and representatives of provincial departments, and local authorities, as well as delegates from Thailand.

The Closing Ceremony was to congratulate the children’s understanding of heritage and inspire them to start applying this knowledge and experience in their local communities.

 


H.E. Kousoum Saroeuth, governor of BMC and H.E. Prak Sonnara, General Director of Heritage, MoCFA, appreciated an implementation of “Heritage for Kids”, and promised to support the project and provided gifts to the children

Program Recognition

This project, supported by many different groups and individuals around the world, recognizes that these children are custodians of Banteay Chhmar’s future, and that they have an important role to play in protecting, preserving, and developing their own cultural heritage for generations.

The children’s activities are being noticed by local people as well as beyond Cambodia’s borders. Many tourists have taken photographs of the school activities and have shown genuine interest. Typically, they see it as a good way to educate young people to think and to solve the problems themselves, and to be aware of the common benefits to the public. This program has also been recognized on an international level, through Heritage Watch.

With a success of the “Heritage for Kids” in step 1, we will proceed with the Heritage for Kids in step 2 “Training in Heritage and Environment” in next January 2016.

Who sponsors the project?

The Heritage for Kids Project was sponsored by donors throughout the world (via Kickstarter) with direct implementation by Heritage Watch in cooperation and the Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts, APSARA National Authority and the CRMA Project as well as with strong support by Banteay Meanchey Provincial Hall and the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.

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Newsflash Fri, 11 Sep 2015 04:59:29 -0500
Cambodian School Children have been putting a basic concept of heritage into their lives in their villages. http://www.heritagewatchinternational.org/cambodian-school-children-have-been-putting-a-basic-concept-of-heritage-into-their-lives-in-their-villages.html Living far from the center of Cambodia in a remote community, 90 Cambodian school children at Banteay Chhmar Primary School are taking an innovative role in their education.  They are taking part in a “Heritage for Kids” Program in an effort to protect the famous architectural, historical and cultural site of Banteay Chhmar from deterioration caused by illegal looting and poor land- used development.



Why has Heritage Watch started training young children?

Young people easily acclimate to their surroundings and need to be oriented towards meaningful relationships. The kids’ understanding of their heritage values should include protection and preservation.  In Banteay Chhmar Primary School the children apply their knowledge, interpreting their understanding to others in their villages and visitors from other countries. 

Objectives

  1. To provide heritage education to the young school children who were born, attend schools and live within the cultural heritage environment at Banteay Chhmar, so that they understand their own long-standing cultural heritage and values.
  2. To design lesson plans and course material that implements the heritage education program at the levels of primary and secondary schools in Cambodia.

 

Methodology

The Heritage for Kids Project involves 90 young school children from two classes at the 5th Grade of Banteay Chhmar primary school.  They are between 10 and 15 years old. The project provides the kids with a basic concepts of tangible and intangible heritage and, through activities—such as using coloring and reading comic books, historic site visits, and museum visits—provides opportunities to explore important ideas.

The lesson plans and educational activities are introduced to the teachers will in advance in order to get them involved in promoting their students’ performance.

The project encourages the kids to start thinking about some of the problems related to looting and the unintended consequences of activities that cause the destruction of the sites.  The students learn that the ignorance about the value of the historical sites gives rise to problems that they can help address. 


The Contents of the Heritage for Kids Program

1.     Defining the terms.  What is heritage?

2.     Different forms of heritage

3.     Natural heritage (features such as a mountain, sea, river, and lake, fauna and flora)

4.     Cultural heritage:

4.1           Tangible cultural heritage

4.2           Intangible cultural heritage

5.     Local heritage: archaeological sites, burials, ancient mounds, kiln sites, early industrial sites and artifacts

6.     Preservation, conservation and management of heritage, in a museum and in the community

7.     Using the coloring book on a site visit

8.     Visiting the Banteay Meanchey Museum

9.     What can we do?  Why is Cambodian heritage so important to you?

The heritage education program normally took place on Saturday afternoons with two sessions: an hour.


The Students of Banteay Chhmar High School

16 students in Grades 11 and 12 at Banteay Chhmar High School, who have been trained in heritage and research methodology by the Khmer-Thai research team of The Cultural Relationship in Mainland SEA Project (CRMA), have researched the archaeological sites at Banteay Chhmar.  These advanced students have joined the Heritage for Kids Project to pass on their knowledge and experience to the younger kids. The advance students led the kids in different groups to historical sites in Banteay Chhmar community.

The Closing Ceremony

On 19 July 2015, the Closing Ceremony of the “Heritage for Kids” Project was organized in Banteay Chhmar primary school with about 150 participants that included the General Director of Heritage of the Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts, the Governor of Banteay Meanchey Province and representatives of provincial departments, local authorities, and  delegates from Thailand.

The Closing Ceremony celebrated the kids’ understanding of their heritage as they start applying this knowledge and experience in their villages.




Being Noticed by the Outside World

The project recognizes that the kids of the villagers are custodians of Banteay Chhmar’s future, and that they have an important role to play in protecting, preserving and developing their own cultural heritage.

The kids’ activities are being noticed by local people and the outside world. Many tourists have taken photographs of the school activities and have shown genuine interest. Typically, they see it as a good way to educate young people to think and to solve the problems themselves, and to be aware of the common benefits to the public.

 

Who sponsors the project?

The Heritage for Kids Project was sponsored donors throughout the world and implemented by Heritage Watch in cooperation with the Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts, APSARA National Authority and the CRMA Project as well as with strong support by Province of Banteay Meanchey and the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.

 

With the success of the “Heritage for Kids” in Stage 1, we will proceed with the Heritage for Kids in Stage 2 “Training in Heritage and Environment” in January 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Newsflash Mon, 31 Aug 2015 05:39:37 -0500
GET BEHIND OUR KICKSTARTER http://www.heritagewatchinternational.org/get-behind-our-kickstarter.html
Please visit https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/164208000/heritage-for-kids to make a pledge!


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Newsflash Mon, 11 May 2015 10:40:16 -0500
Heritage Watch and MoCFA Museum Exhibit http://www.heritagewatchinternational.org/heritage-watch-and-mocfa-museum-exhibit.html The Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts with support and cooperation from Heritage Watch launched Ancestors of Empire at the Provincial Museum in Banteay Meanchey on Oct. 20th. 

The displays highlight research done in the province by the MoCFA and Australian Researchers at Iron Age sites in Northwest Cambodia. The display is now part of a permanent exhibition!]]>
Newsflash Thu, 27 Nov 2014 05:58:01 -0600
Heritage education for Thai and Cambodian kids http://www.heritagewatchinternational.org/heritage-education-for-thai-and-cambodian-kids.html Heritage Watch has just completed the 6th heritage education for students at Banteay Chhmar.

Heritage Watch provided the training materials for the Khmer-Thai Students Seminar on 16 November 2014 at Banteay Chhmar temple. 

The main aim of this heritage education program is to provide the chance for the young students who live within cultural heritage area to learn their own culture, get better understanding of Ethno-Archaeological field and survey methodology with high tech equipment, and to instill them to preserve, protect and manage their own culture heritage in their communities for the future.]]>
Newsflash Thu, 27 Nov 2014 05:56:01 -0600
Wrestler Statue to Return! http://www.heritagewatchinternational.org/wrestler-statue-to-return.html

An ancient statue of a Hindu warrior, pulled from auction two years ago because of assertions that it had been looted from a temple deep in the jungles of Cambodia, will be returned to that country under an agreement signed on Thursday by Sotheby’s, its client and federal officials.

U.S. Attorney's Office, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Sotheby’s will ship a 10th-century sandstone statue of a Hindu warrior back to Cambodia as part of a court settlement.

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The accord ends a long bare-knuckled court battle over the Khmer treasure, a 10th-century statue valued at more than $2 million. The Belgian woman who had consigned it for sale in 2011 will receive no compensation for the statue from Cambodia, and Sotheby’s has expressed a willingness to pick up the cost of shipping the 500-pound sandstone antiquity to that country within the next 90 days.

At the same time, lawyers from the United States Attorney’s Office in Manhattan who had been pursuing the statue on Cambodia’s behalf agreed to withdraw allegations that the auction house and the consignor knew of the statue’s disputed provenance before importing it for sale.

The accord said the consignor, Decia Ruspoli di Poggio Suasa, who had long owned the statue, “voluntarily determined, in the interests of promoting cooperation and collaboration with respect to cultural heritage,” that it should be returned.

Andrew Gully, a spokesman for Sotheby’s, said the auction house was gladdened that “the agreement confirms that Sotheby’s and its client acted properly at all times.”

Cambodian officials said they were elated by the settlement. “We are very pleased with the help from the American government because so many of our statues are stolen and missing and we want them for the Cambodian people,” said Chan Tani, the country’s secretary of state.

The case has placed a renewed focus on Cambodian sculptures from the Koh Ker region, a once-thriving Khmer metropolis, in American museum collections. Earlier this year the Metropolitan Museum of Art returned two statues that had been prominently displayed in its Southeast Asia gallery after federal investigators showed the museum evidence that the statues, known as the Kneeling Attendants, had probably been illicitly removed from the same temple setting as the statue in the Sotheby’s dispute, known as the Duryodhana.

With the return of those three statues, Cambodia’s quest will now turn to the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, Calif., where a twin statue to the Duryodhana, known as the Bhima, has been in the collection since 1980. Mr. Tani said officials from the museum plan to visit Cambodia early next year to explore the Bhima’s original site and hold talks about its possible return.

The settlement, filed in United States District Court in Manhattan, declared that all sides agreed that additional litigation “would be burdensome and would require resolution of disputed factual issues and issues of U.S., Cambodian, French Colonial, and other law.” 

In a statement, the United States attorney in Manhattan, Preet Bharara, said, “Today’s settlement reunites a priceless artifact with its rightful owners, the people of Cambodia.”

 “The United States is not a market for antiquities stolen from other nations,” he added, “and we will continue to track down and return any that are brought here illegally.”

Mr. Bharara’s office had taken an intense interest in the case, at one point sending two prosecutors to the Prasat Chen temple site at Koh Ker, the original location of the statues at issue. The Koh Ker temple complex is in northern Cambodia, some 75 miles from Angkor Wat, and was extensively looted in the 1970s and 1980s.

The Duryodhana, part of a group of sculptures depicting Hindu epics, had stood at Prasat Chen for a millennium before it was broken from its feet and pedestal and spirited abroad, an act of pillage that archaeological experts say took place in the early ’70s.

The dispute over the statue began in 2011 when the Cambodian government asked Sotheby’s to remove it from sale on the very morning it was to be auctioned in Manhattan.

Featured on the cover of the auction house’s catalog for that month, the Duryodhana was described as an unrivaled masterwork. “If one could choose only one sculpture to represent the glory of Khmer art, this figure could fulfill such a challenge,” the catalog said.

While the auction house agreed to pull the statue from the sale, it rejected Cambodia’s request to return it as stolen property. Instead, the auction house told Cambodian officials that it viewed the statue as the lawful property of its consignor, Ms. Ruspoli, and that Cambodia should consider purchasing it directly through Sotheby’s.

United States officials entered the dispute on Cambodia’s side last year, filing court papers that asserted that the statue constituted stolen property under Cambodian law and had entered the United States illegally as a result. In the filing, federal lawyers accused Sotheby’s of trafficking in stolen property and trying to concoct a false ownership trail that would legitimize the statue’s presence at auction.

Sotheby’s vehemently denied the charges and challenged the government’s case, arguing that evidence of when the statue may have been taken was thin and that the Cambodian laws the government was relying on were moot because they were adopted in the early 1900s when Cambodia was still a French colony.

The settlement signed on Thursday specifically said that the federal authorities no longer contend that Sotheby’s or the consignor had done anything to mislead anyone about the statue’s provenance.

Although the Department of Homeland Security’s immigration and customs enforcement branch moved to seize the statue at one point, a court ruled that it should remain under Sotheby’s care until a final resolution in the case.


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/13/arts/design/disputed-statue-to-be-returned-to-cambodia.html?_r=0&adxnnl=1&emc=eta1&adxnnlx=1386889507-wdFOEuXULRGf0Dh4zKSNdA


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Newsflash Fri, 13 Dec 2013 05:13:25 -0600
Heritage Watch supported Book Published http://www.heritagewatchinternational.org/heritage-watch-supported-book-published.html
http://www.cambodiadaily.com/news/scholar-fills-void-publishes-first-textbook-on-old-khmer-48406/
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Newsflash Wed, 04 Dec 2013 11:47:12 -0600
New iPad Guide for Angkor http://www.heritagewatchinternational.org/new-ipad-guide-for-angkor.html http://www.interactiveangkor.com]]> Newsflash Mon, 23 Sep 2013 08:16:09 -0500 Wat Bo theft http://www.heritagewatchinternational.org/wat-bo-theft.html Koh Santepheap Daily reported on January 10th, 2013:

Artifacts stolen from Reach Bo pagoda

Siem Reap province: Several pre-Angkorian artifacts dating back even to the years BC, and made of gold and bronze, and displayed in the Rajabo pagoda, Siem Reap provincial town for tourists to see, were stolen last night.

Pich Sam-ol, deputy chief of police administration post in Sala Komroek commune, said on January 10 that more than one person might have broken into the building, opened the cabinets displaying the artifacts, and took them away from 9 pm to midnight, January 9, 2013. He also said that the number of artifacts was not known yet and only the pagoda committee knew the number. There were in all 19 cabinets holding artifacts for daily display in the pagoda.

According to the chief monks Pin Sem and Sirey Sovannor, who helped collect artifacts after the war ended, the artifacts include 3 pairs of wristlets made of bronze, 5 pairs of earrings plated with gold, 1 bronze pendant, 2 bronze finger rings, and 1 pair of bronze Kav (ceremonial earrings).

He also said that according to the archeologists from the National Museum in Phnom Penh, those priceless artifacts date back to pre-Ankorian period and BC periods. Koh Santepheap Daily will publish more details about this. Radio FM 87.75, Phnom Penh and Radio FM 87.5, Battambang will broadcast information related to this incident as well.
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Newsflash Tue, 29 Jan 2013 04:23:29 -0600
Two New Board Members for Heritage Watch http://www.heritagewatchinternational.org/two-new-board-members-for-heritage-watch.html
We welcome our new Board members and look forward to a long and fruitful cooperation. 

Mr Kent Davis, has, for personal reasons, stepped down from the Board to join our Advisory Board. Heritage Watch is very grateful for all the hard work Kent put in over the years and we look forward to drawing on his vast resources of contacts and knowledge as an Advisory Board Member.]]>
Newsflash Fri, 25 Jan 2013 05:14:55 -0600